Changing Seasons in the Park: February 2016

A visit from some friends had us wandering around some of Vancouver’s garden parks this month.

I was disappointed in the garden beds full of anticipation and not much else, but our friends were delighted, running around identifying all the trees and remarking, “It’s so much more enjoyable when the trees are bare and you can see the bark and the structure of the trees…”

Accordingly I went back to Queen Elizabeth park for my February ‘Season Challenge’ and tried to focus on the bark and structure of the trees.

Paperbark Maple (Acer Griseum).

One of the biggest challenges was actually isolating the structure of the tree in amongst the busy background of the landscaping. Not all trees had a sunny spotlight on them like this small Paperbark Maple.
Paperbark Maple in Vancouver's Queen Elizabeth Park in February Showing off its rust-coloured peeling bark.
Paperbark Maple tree with its peeling barkThe peeling bark of this tree has such a Japanese aesthetic quality to it.
Close-up of the peeling bark of the Paperbark Maple Tree Japanese art bark Cherry Dogwood also known as the Japanese Cornelius (Cornus officinalis).

This is one of the earliest blooming trees with its clusters of tiny yellow flowers covering it in a yellow haze.
the clusters of tiny yellow flowers on the Japanese Cornelian tree in February This is the best I could do in capturing the structure of this small tree.
the clusters of tiny yellow flowers on the Japanese Cornelian tree The clusters of tiny yellow flowers are no more than a centimetre across.
the clusters of tiny yellow flowers on the Japanese Cornelian tree in FebruaryClose-up of the flowers.
the clusters of tiny yellow flowers on the Japanese Cornelian tree in February Corkscrew Hazel (Corylus avellana) with its yellow catkins.

I had to google this one to identify it and found it was often tagged with ‘Four Seasons Garden’. Trying to isolate this intriguing twisty tree against the busy plantings in the background was challenging, and I will have to try it again next November when there is less going on.
the yellow catkins of the Corkscrew Hazel in Vancouver's Queen Elizabeth Park in February A close-up of the yellow catkins.
the yellow catkins of the Corkscrew Hazel in Vancouver's Queen Elizabeth Park in February Western Larch (Larix occidentalis).

Larches are one of the few deciduous coniferous trees, losing their needles in the autumn. I was in for a surprise when I got up close and spotted small pink blooms on its hanging branches.
the pink flower buds of the Larch tree in February the pink flower buds of the Larch tree in February close up of the buds on the hanging branches of the Larch tree in February the hanging branches of the Larch tree in February

More of Cardinal Guzman’s the Changing Seasons February 2016.

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3 responses to “Changing Seasons in the Park: February 2016

  1. Pingback: The Changing Seasons: February 2016 – Cardinal Guzman·

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