Some Fig Trees with Twining Growth and Strangling Habits

I saw my first Banyan tree in San Diego in 1976 and the first thought that came to my mind was to make a macrame art piece of it – Hey, it was 1976!

Banyan Tree in Mexico in the photo app Snapseed with a square cropBanyan Tree in Mexico in the photo app Snapseed with a square cropBanyan Tree in Mexico in the photo app Snapseed with a square cropFicus benjamina, commonly called a ‘Weeping Fig’, with similar growth habits but shiny marquise-shaped leaves. Ficus Benjamina at Wat Pho, a temple in Bangkok, ThailandFicus altissima, a twining tree known as ‘Trang’ in Cambodian (Angkor Wat, Cambodia).Ficus Benjamina, a twining tree at Angkor Wat, CambodiaThese massive tree roots intertwined amongst the temples of Angkor Wat may also belong to a ‘Trang’. Tree roots enveloping a temple at Angkor Wat, CambodiaWrapped Bodhi tree (Ficus Religiosa) at Wat Pho, a Buddhist temple in Bangkok, Thailand.Wrapped Bodhi tree at Wat Pho in BangkokNot all fig trees have aerial roots to wrap around themselves: the Ficus elastica, better known as the Rubber Tree, produces rubber, and Ficus carica are the fig trees that produce edible figs.Figs in the Hortus Gardens in Amsterdam, HollandMore of Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Curves.

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2 responses to “Some Fig Trees with Twining Growth and Strangling Habits

  1. Had seen so many photos of the tree-wrapped building in Angkor Wat that I expected to be disappointed. I most certainly was not😊. Excellent examples Elizabeth

    • Angkor Wat definitely did not disappoint. However I didn’t mention in this post that the most photogenic overgrown temples had queues of people waiting their turn at being photographed among the massive tree roots. When I think back perhaps the queues of people would have been a more realistic photo of travel today!

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