Summer/winter at the duck pond

Using Opposites for Diptychs

Over the last year or so I’ve been working on diptychs – playing with a combination of opposites and similarities.

I initially called them Natural, Unnatural, the majority being macros of tree bark (natural) combined with eroded urban objects (unnatural). The first two images are an example of this.

Organic, Man-made: Abstract diptych of ridged white Birch bark combined with a concrete support column of a bridge. Abstract diptych of ridged white Birch bark with a cement pier column of a bridge

Organic, Man-made: Abstract diptych of tree bark with fungi combined with a fountain surround under renovation; also a dark fissure in light tree bark combines with a light ‘fissure’ in a dark background. abstract diptych of tree bark with fungi combined with a fountain under renovation, 34"x 24"

At some point I brought in rocks although never explored this much, still I thought I’d add them here since rocks are also natural…

Natural, Unnatural: Abstract diptych of rusty shale rock with a collection of black and white ripped posters on a lamppost. Abstract diptych of rusty shale rock with a collection of black and white ripped posters on a lamppost

Natural, Unnatural: a selection from a rock wall in Banff, Canada, combined with another set of ripped posters.
abstract diptych of slate in Banff combined with a ripped poster

Two weathered walls, with opposite colouring: Abstract diptych of a grey wall with splotches of orange together with a orange wall with underlying grey wall exposed, both from Mexico. abstract diptych of a weathered grey wall in Mexico City together with a weathered red-orange wall in Puebla

Summer/winter at the duck pond.

The same twisted tree looking at it from the pond in the late summer; then looking at it from the other side, covered in snow 5 months later. The similarities result from using Photoshop’s ‘Cut-out’ filter on both, and the few yellow leaves that didn’t fall off.Summer/winter at the duck pond

More of the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Opposites.

6 thoughts on “Using Opposites for Diptychs

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