Historical Colours at a Recreated Village in Aarhus, Denmark

In Denmark there are several recreated villages like Den Gamle By in Aarhus.

The houses and businesses are painstakingly reconstructed and painted with historical paints of the time period that they came from.

Samples of historical colours being tested in the recreated village of Den Gamle By in Aarhus, DenmarkSome examples of historical colours from the 1800s. It starts at the left with artificial Ultramarine, and then goes onto the earth colours which have been used for pigments since the cavemen first started painting their caves: Green Earth, Yellow Ochre, Red Ochre, Burnt Umber and Vine Black. Each of the pigments has two swatches, the left being ‘Distemper’, where the pigment was mixed with chalk and casein or animal glue, and the right being the darker pigment and Linseed Oil mix. Aarhus Historic Village Historic ColoursBlood from oxen and casein from milk are two proteins that were often used as binders for coloured pigments in the early days. Aarhus Historic Village Historical Colour-Mixing: Oxblood and CasienOx Blood was used to achieve rich dark reds. Ox Blood was used to achieve rich dark reds found in the recreated village of Den Gamle By in Aarhus, DenmarkA window looking out on an old half-timbered building. The bricks were often covered with a very thin layer of mud and then painted with Burnt Sienna, also called Red Ochre or Red Earth.
A window on an old half-timbered building in Den Gamle By, recreated villages set in different times, in Aarhus, DenmarkBy far, these two reds were the most popular colours to paint the buildings in the 1864 section of the village. But this Post Office with a red Telegraf sign from 1927 was painted in Green Earth.A Post Office with a red Telegraf sign at the recreated village of Den Gamle By in Aarhus, DenmarkI had to go to Copenhagen to get good examples of yellow ochres. I suppose that in those days everyone used the most common earth colours found in the region.Bright houses in Nyhavn in Copenhagen, DenmarkBone Black came from burnt bones. Bone Black, an example of a historical colours at Den Gamle By, an historic village in Aarhus, DenmarkBone Black, an example of a historical colours at Den Gamle By, an historic village in Aarhus, DenmarkNone of the buildings were painted black although some of the half-timbered houses had the timbers highlighted in black. An old half-timbered brick building in Den Gamle By, recreated villages set in different times, in Aarhus, Denmark

Now here’s a colour I didn’t find on any buildings, a morbid mauve called Caput Mortuum Violet, a purple-brown pigment made from the crushed skulls of mummies.In the Aarhus Historic Village, Den Gamle By, the beautiful colour violet made from the skulls of ancient mummies

Lens Artists Photo Challenge: History

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8 responses to “Historical Colours at a Recreated Village in Aarhus, Denmark

  1. I love this history of paint colors. I was surprised at first at the vibrant colors, but I really like them. I think we forget that history can be vibrant too and it isn’t just in black and white!!

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